Choosing Lighting Positions

For this section, I am going to concentrate on the different positions in which you can light a performance. This will enable me to choose from a range of positions to help with my lighting design for Acting and Musical Theatre.

Lighting from the front:

Image result for stagelightingguide

A vertical beam will be more efficient for lighting from the front, as the lit area of the stage and the shadows, should be no wider than the actor. One con of this is that the actors eyes will then be seen as black holes and the nose (which will be highlighted from the lantern) will then shade the mouth, making the facial features less noticeable.

 

 

 

Image result for stagelightingguideWhen the lantern is moved slightly forward, it will start to reach the actors mouth and eyes (if the chin is being held upright in the right posture.) However, with the lantern being brought forward, shadows will be present. The shadow cast from the actor will go more upstage.

 

 

 

Image result for stagelightingguideAs the lighting comes more to the front, the actors facial features become more visible as they receive more light. Again, this increases the shadow which expands further and further upstage with the likelihood of the shadow hitting the scenery.

 

 

 

Image result for stagelightingguideAs the lighting is right at the front of the stage, the actors  features becomes too bright as well as the scenery. The shadows increase dramatically. When the lighting is like this, the beam shape goes horizontal, known as a corridor, which shows the entire depth of the stage, and the actors shadow becomes the same as the actors length.

 

 

Image result for stagelightingguideLighting from below projects the actors shadow, so it goes bigger when the actor is closer to the lantern. But when the actor moves further away, the shadow will decrease. When there is only this lighting angle, the light on the face reflects will soften the harsh features.